Archives for posts with tag: Exhibitions

New Exhibitions

6-21 October 2017

Opening Event: Friday 6 October 6-8pm

Artist Talks: Saturday 21 October 3-5pm

GALLERY ONE

Kendal Heyes

Pilgrims and Strangers

6 – 21 October 2017

This series is about voyagers on the sea, those who arrive at their intended destination and those who don’t make it, and especially those who are kept on the outside of borders that ideally should be open to them.

Freedom of movement is a basic human right; therefore there should be open borders between states. The principle is that simple. I like to think at some point in the future people will look back and see restrictive national borders as the greatest injustice of this era, equivalent to the restriction of opportunities for peasants in the Middle Ages.*

In the meantime countries like Germany and Canada are at least working humanely in ways that gesture toward a future of open borders, while Australia persists with its harsh treatment of refugees under its secretive offshore detention regime.

These drawings are partly in response to the wilful cruelty of the Australian government in its treatment of refugees. The making of these images one dot at a time is literally an extended meditation on the issue of asylum seekers trying to reach Australia by sea. The dot-image format also highlights the media’s often problematic role in representing refugees.

KH 2017

*For discussion of open borders, see Joseph Carens, The Case for Open Borders, in The Ethics of Immigration, Oxford, 2013, p225, and Rutger Bregman, Beyond the Gates of the Land of Plenty, in Utopia for Realists, Bloomsbury, 2016, p214.

GALLERY TWO

6-21 October 2017

Carolyn Craig

Katelyn Dunn

Caity Reynolds

The Human Version of a Used Car

The failure of subjective conformance is ritualised in the practices of three contemporary female artists who each fear mail with official stamps, corner views, unkempt desire and gambling ratios.

THE CRANNY

6-21 October 2017

Annee Miron

Candy Royalle

Even The Young

Wordsmith, Candy Royalle and visual artist, Annee Miron met as artists-in-residence on Wodi Wodi land of the Yuin nation at Bundanon. Australian red cedar (Toona Ciliata) once extended through rainforests from Southern NSW to Far North Queensland. After 1778 the felling or “getting” of those cedars played a significant part in colonisation. By 1970 it was harvested almost to extinction.

As they waiver, reach, and seek to acknowledge the Australian red cedar tree, Royalle and Miron invite you to participate in their collaboration. Even The Young requires its audience to gather and activate both the words and installation, and our relationship to that past and our future.

DEEP SPACE

Catherine Polcz

Corpus: Part 2

Catherine Polcz, artist, scientist and museologist, presents Corpus: a guide to the human body, a pop-up museum that explores the body, medicine and materiality through the display of historical artifacts, scientific tools and art.

This exhibition examines the body as a concept that merges science, pseudo-science, design and art. The simultaneous exploration of these themes allows us to creatively consider our relationship to our bodies throughout history and in different disciplines within distinct theoretical frameworks. The exhibition presents a multifaceted concept of the human body through the display of sixty unique objects. This  is Part 2 of an exhibition that is  expanding over a three-month period from September to November.

Images top to bottom: 1. Kendal Heyes, Untitled, 2017, ink on paper, 100 x 150cm. Image courtesy of the artist.  2. Carolyn Craig, Angles of Incidence Panel #3, 2016, etching on folded aluminium, 254.5 x 34cm. Image courtesy of the artist.  3. (LHS) Caity Reynolds, Self Preservation Dental Plan, 2015-16, unfired clay, variable  (RHS) Katelyn Jane Dunn, Sponge photograph, 2016,  variable. Image courtesy of the artists. 3. Even The Young (detail),  2017, found cardboard, charcoal, and a little PVA glue. Image by Annee Miron 4. Catherine Polcz, Corpus, 2017, digital banner. Courtesy of the artist.

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The August exhibitions have now concluded and we are now preparing the galleries for the installation of the September exhibitions

1-16 September 2017

Opening: Friday 1 September, 6-8pm

Talks: Saturday 16 September, 3-5pm

GALLERY ONE

Red Herring II: Construct

Anthony Cahill and Pollyxenia Joannou

This collaboration explores what Cahill and Joannou surmised to be the similarities of each other’s work when exhibited side by side having been sight unseen by the other. It was decided that a theme could be used to give connection, a starting point for the exhibition. This connection was to be based on the subject of ‘construct’ (a complex image or idea constructed, piled or put together).
 
Joannou and Cahill settled on a format, proceeded to their studios and over the past 12 months, have produced this body of work.

GALLERY TWO AND THE CRANNY

Wood Is Part Of Life

Ajay Sharma

Master miniature painter Ajay Sharma and partner Vinita Sharma, will be presenting new paintings and works in the tradition of Indian miniature painting from their studio in Jaipur. Ajay Sharma’s series, Wood Is Part Of Life, is about the cycle of life. It is a reflection on how trees are part of this cycle and how wood accompanies us from birth to death.

Ajay Sharma’s exhibition will be accompanied by two 5-day miniature painting workshops. There are still places left in Workshop 2 from 11-15 September. Go to SquarePeg Studios for more information and bookings.

GALLERY TWO AND THE CRANNY

Recent Paintings

Vinita Sharma

AirSpace Projects presents new paintings by Vinita Sharma as well as works in the tradition of miniature painting. Vinita Sharma has taken elements from different aspects of ancient Indian culture such as paintings, books, clothing, everyday implements, motifs and symbols and combined those elements to create her own unique compositions.

DEEP SPACE

Catherine Polcz

Corpus: a guide to the human body

Catherine Polcz, artist, scientist and museologist, this year presents Corpus: a guide to the human body, a pop-up museum that explores the body, medicine and materiality through the display of historical artifacts, scientific tools and art. This will be an expanding project at AirSpace projects over a three-month period, from September to November.

This exhibition will examine the body as a concept that merges science, pseudoscience, design and art. The simultaneous exploration of these themes allows us to creatively consider our relationship to our bodies throughout history and in different disciplines with distinct theoretical frameworks. The exhibition presents a multifaceted concept of the human body through the display of sixty unique objects.

Catherine Polcz is an artist, scientist and museologist. She holds a Bachelors of Science in Environmental Science and Biology and a Masters in Plant Science and has studied documentary media and photography at universities and artist-run centres in Canada. She creates interdisciplinary projects that inspire critical thinking about science. Her recent project, Herba Morbus: Museum of Plant Intelligence, was a researched and playful exhibition about historical and contemporary ideas around plant sentience and behaviour. In addition to curating her own museum exhibitions, Catherine is a curatorial researcher with the unconventional and critically renown design centre, Mmuseumm, in New York.

To view expansions of this exhibition please note the dates below

October 6-21
Opening: Friday 6 October, 6-8pm
November 3-18
Opening: Friday 3 November, 6-8pm

This project has been supported by


Images top to bottom: 1. September exhibitions composite image 2. (left) Anthony Cahill, Monument, 2017, oil on canvas, 140 x 140cm. Image courtesy of the artist and (right) Pollyxenia Joannou, Construct, 2017, oil on canvas, 140 x 140cm. Photo credit: John McRae 3. Ajay Sharma, Youth, 2017, stone pigments, khariya on wasli paper, 29.5 x 40cm. Image courtesy of the artist. 4. Vinita Sharma, Untitled, 2017, stone and natural pigments with khariya, gum arabic on wasli paper, 25.5 cm x 35.5cm. Image courtesy of the artist. 5. Catherine Polcz, banner for corpus: a guide to the human body. Courtesy of the artist.

 

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August Exhibitions

 4 –  19 August 2017

Opening Friday 4 August 6-8pm

Artist Talks Saturday 19 August 3-5pm

10 Junction street Marrickville

6 minutes easy walk aong Schwebel Street from Marrickville Station


GALLERY ONE

Landscaping

Amala Groom

Kim Mahood

Nicole Monks

Katya Petetskaya

Douglas Schofield

Peter Sharp

Kristel Smits

 Landscaping brings together the work of seven artists: Amala Groom, Kim Mahood, Nicole Monks, Katya Petetskaya, Douglas Schofield, Peter Sharp and Kristel Smits. Normally understood as a process whereby land is physically modified according to an aesthetic schema, landscaping, in this exhibition, becomes a way of seeing, being and responding. The aim is to bring a variety of perspectives into a dialogue, whether they are driven by formal considerations and/or political and cultural imperatives.

GALLERY TWO

Marie McMahon

Weathered

Perforated colour-forms and flow formations. Recent paintings.

These experiments with organic form and colour come from interactions with some of the natural phenomena at Cape Banks and Cruwee Cove in Botany Bay, from fungus growing in the bush to the contents of rockpools and the perforations created by the weathering of rocks.

THE CRANNY

Jodi Woodward

Matter(ed) Memory

“Our present is the materiality of our life, it is unique for each moment of duration.” (Bergson, H. 1911)

The physicality and alchemy of this drawing investigation, uses steel and paper to contest the delicate and volatile relationship between the two mediums. Drawn with plasma and molten ash this performative record evidences time, chance and endurance, challenging notions of survival and wholeness.

DEEP SPACE

Rosie Thomas

What am I doing? Why are you here?

Time is problematic. It is a measurement of distance. A non-solid that fills a space. What am I doing? Why are you here? proposes a disorientation of ones self in a non-space. Here the artist intersects the real and the invented and invites her audience to be actively self-reflexive. The artist negotiates the moments of failure associated an unsustainable and only partially accessible poetic time-associated materiality.

Images from top to bottom: Amala Groom, Portrait of a Woman, 2015, Epsom pigment print on Ilford Gallerie gloss 310gsm, ed 1/10 + 1AP. Image: Liz Warning; Marie McMahon, Perforated Polychrome #2, 2017. Photo Warren Mackriss, Hi Res Digital Imaging; Jodi Woodward, Plate 1 (detail), 5mm mild steel and ink, 30 x 60cm, Image by Eliza McInnes; and Rosie Thomas, What am I doing? (detail) Why are you here? 2017, Image courtesy of the artist.

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ARTIST TALKS

Saturday 22 July 3-5pm

Join the artists for talks and afternoon tea this Saturday

Gallery One

Fangled

Sally Clarke, Brenda Factor,

Sean O’Connell, Laura Woodward

Gallery Two

Lorna Grear

WeaveThe Cranny

Marian Abboud

Kiss Them While They’re Sleeping

Deep Space

Claire Field and Bronwyn Treacy


Images top to bottom: Fangled features a composite of details from top: Laura Woodward, The Tolling, 2016, mixed media, courtesy of the artist; Sean O’Connell, Franjipani, 2017, Sean O’Connell, Frangipani, 2017, 30,000 volts AC 800Hz across Fuji Velvia 100 colour slide film, 22 x 22 x 8cm. Image courtesy of the artist; Sally Clarke, Big Cow, plasticine on wall, 2015. Luminere Imaging; and Brenda Factor, After Louise B., spray paint on aluminium, 2008. Luminere Imaging; Lorna Grear, Moonjoybei, 2017, hand drawn ink on paper digitally manipulated, 70 x 42 cm. Image courtesy of the artist; Favoureconomy banner, 2017, courtesy of Claire Field and Bronwyn Treacy.

 

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AirSpace Projects is currently closed while we install the May Exhibitions

May Exhibitions

5-21 May 2017

10 Junction Street, Marrickville

Just 6 minutes easy walk from Marrickville Station

Opening Event: Friday 5 May, 6-8pm

Artist Talks: Saturday 20 May, 3-5pm

Open Sunday 21 May from 11-5 for the 20/21 May

Inner West Studio Trail

Gallery One

Misael M.
Prolegomena: About filters, codification and domestication

“One must distinguish between what is understood and what is not understood”

–Søren Kierkegaard

Prolegomena: About filters, codification and domestication stems from an attempt to expose the precarious basis of the human communicational/epistemological system. Understood from signic to symbolic systems, including all the complexities associated with the interpretation of meaning (hermeneutics).

Focusing on the treatment of certain semantic and linguistic theories (namely those of Ferdinand de Saussure, Charles S. Pierce, Umberto Eco, Edmund Husserl, Foucault, etc.), the investigation is presented as a triadic system of understanding the world

(filters, codification and domestication), with the possibility of emancipation via a fourth subversive one: The language of poetics; that constant which creates the intertextuality among apparently dissimilar topics, the epiphany after a paroxysm, the slang, the neologism, the mystics of the absurd.

“The irony rises and subverts; humour falls and perverts”, says Foucault in his Theatrum Philosophicum, and the proposal emphasises this; the best way to learn and destroy is through humour & confusion (at least that is what we think for now).

Note to the public:

This exhibition is just an ‘attempt’ and therefore we take full responsibility for the suicidal task. Any complaints will only be received in written form, with the exception of those individuals who may lack hands.

Gallery Two

Eunjoo Jang

The Illusion that is Reality

The Illusion that is Reality explores the phenomenon of virtualisation, which is often referred to as ‘blended reality’. It describes the time and space that allows a person to experience different realities, which in Jang’s case, is explored through virtual layers employing mobile technologies.

Jang’s work encapsulates the process of virtualisation and how it exceeds the limits of our physical world by creating another dimension for individuals to experience. This transition into a new dimension, an unconscious world, opens the possibility to travel into the world of dreams and imagination.

Jang uses her body to map the city area by undertaking a series of walks over a period of several months. Her routes are then reviewed and processed through Google maps and translated into a series of scratch holograms, an analogue technique of drawing on aluminium to make representations through light diffraction, reflection and interference. By allowing the elusive, moving effects of the scratch holograms and the line drawings in aluminium to co-exist, Jang balances the modalities of actual and virtual.

The Cranny

Stella Chen

Facade of Memory

Facade of Memory is an installation presented by artist Stella Chen. This exhibition questions the accuracy of recollection and portrays the present as a state of flux. Chen’s work locates itself in the past and present by delving into the unreliable, fraudulent and fragmented nature of memory.

Chen comes from a traditional family in Taiwan and lives as a migrant in Australia. For Chen, the sense of dislocation created by making a home in a new country holds parallels to the traditional cultural practice of ‘Tongyangxi’, whereby girls are adopted into the family of their future husbands. Chen explores her personal history through the execution of a caged hoop skirt, which signifies her immersion into Western society while simultaneously symbolising female identity within a patriarchal world.

Deep Space

Ajay and Vinita Sharma

Review before the Storm

Ajay and Vinita Sharma have been exhibiting their works at AirSpace Projects since 2014. In September this year, they will be exhibiting new original works and a selection of copy-works in the tradition of Indian miniature painting. Ajay is a master miniature painter from Jaipur and is internationally renown for both his original paintings on paper and copy-work, which is particularly defined by his mastery of natural pigments and subject matter. He has exhibited his work at the Julie Saul Gallery in New York in collaboration with Julie Evans, an exhibition that featured in major journals such as Art in America and Artforum. Vinita exhibited her fine original and copy-works in her first solo exhibition at AirSpace Projects in 2016. Vinita has been involved in Ajay Sharma’s production and teaching studio for at least twenty years and her work is now receiving attention in its own right. This is an exciting opportunity to view their works currently available for sale at AirSpace Projects.

 

Images from top: Misael M., Topologytopologia. Courtesy of the artist; Eunjoo Jang, Vitruvian Ocean Blue. Courtesy of the artist; Stella Chen, Facade of Caged Memory, 2015, photograph, 59.4 x 84.1cm. Courtesy of the artist; Ajay Sharma, Life (Invariable Loss of Parental Guidance), 2014. Stone and natural pigments, 35.5 x 40cm. From the Speed of Life series. Image courtesy of the artist.

I See Queer People

Three Exhibitions

10-25 February 2017

All Welcome

queerfeb2017

Images (clockwise from top left): Kieran Butler, A self-portrait for you, for me, for yoooo, for M and A and Gee too. 2016, Digital image file. Courtesy of the artist. Danica Knezevic, Constant Reflections, 2013, single channel, HD video. Courtesy of the artist. Tim Hilton/Ladonna Rama. Courtesy of the artist. Phil Soliman, The Vast Interior (View from the cave of St Anthony the Great), digital photograph. Courtesy of the artist.

mardi-gras-festival-2017

AirSpace Projects
10 Junction Street, Marrickville
Just 6 minutes easy walk from Marrickville Station

Opening Event

Friday 10 February 6-8pm

Artist Talks

As part of the

Sydney Gay and Lesbian Mardi Gras Festival 2017

Saturday 25 February 3-5pm

Gallery One

Boys don’t cry

Kieran Butler

170105_kb_a-self-portrait-for-you-for-me-for-yoooo-for-m-and-a-and-gee-too-copy-2

Boys don’t cry is a tragic love story, a casual hook-up and an awkward first time. It’s all the feelings you couldn’t say, the coming out you never always wanted and a person you thought you could fall in love with.

Boys don’t cry is about the materialities of love and relationships, the 21st century’s constant stream of information, and the way their associated power relations aid the breakdown and construction of one’s own identity. This exhibition is one instance of how we might work through the endless experiences of being under construction, the questions we ask, the self-doubt we face, the love we feel and the places, real, imagined, semi-fictional or fluid it may take us to; online or offline.

For myself, as a gay man, this has been a long, enduring and seemingly lonely experience, a slow construction of my own identity full of self-doubt. I ask myself questions about masculinity, femininity, LGBTQI colloquial language and popular culture; things I don’t understand, things I want to reject/accept, things I’ve felt removed from yet so close to at the same time. In the digital age materiality points to a mess of diverse factors where materiality itself can be an effect of “an ongoing performance”.[1] In this work I am referring to my own ongoing unsuccessful and semi-fictional performances of love as a homosexual, the identity politics of my own socio-political context and how I navigate them.

I am not the first to say boys don’t cry and this exhibition is by no means definitive of LGBTQI experiences. It is merely one of the many stories that exist in spaces that are real and tangible, sometimes imagined, semi-fictional and fluid.

[1] Lange Berndt, P. Documents of Contemporary Art: Materiality, MIT Press, London, 2015, pg.12

Gallery Two and The Cranny

Disco Infirmo

Trevor Fry
Tina Havelock Stevens
Danica Knesevic
Renny Kodgers
Ladonnarama
Sean Lowry
Daniel Mudie Cunningham
Jane Polkinghorne
Ingrid Stiertzel

Curated by Jane Polkinghorne

4-dknezevic-constantr

Disco conjures a nostalgically, shiny, glamorous past while simultaneously suggesting disco’s collapse into a sparkling hole of excess and ridicule.

Disco Infirmo uses disco in the Australian context as its starting point, remote from the high glamour of the disco era at its peak at Studio 54, New York Operating from Australian vernaculars of ‘secondhandism’, the artists incorporate and infect this imported form, corrupting, mutilating and lionising via Australian cultural anti-glamour.

The artists respond to the sensations that Disco Infirmo evokes – nostalgia, sparkles, nausea, dance fails, Blue Light Discos, ridiculous fashion, rhythmic music, those too old for the dance floor, the bad and almost good dancers, Aussie pub rock discos, and mum and dad dancing inappropriately. Out of time and out of place, and yet the disco continues to be a democratic field for creative expression.

Deep Space

Worse than Animals

Phil Soliman

still-from-worse-than-animals-hd-video-loop-with-sound-2016

In Worse than animals, Melbourne-based multidisciplinary artist Phil Soliman takes the worst insult he has ever endured and shapes it into a powerful symbol of identity. A gloriously psychedelic mashup of pop culture, internet ephemera, ancient Egyptian mythology and house music, this video installation challenges toxic homophobia and other types of othering with humour and insight.

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Artists’ Talks

Saturday 17 September  3-5pm

septemberexhibitions2016

10 Junction Street Marrickville

Just 6 minutes walk along Schwebel Street

from Marrickville station

Pollyxenia Joannou, Anthony Cahill, Kendal Heyes, Francesca Mataraga and Mog&Mog will discuss the ideas underpinning their outstanding exhibitions from 3pm. At 4pm tea and home-baked cakes will be served over casual conversation. Everyone is welcome to show-off their prowess in the kitchen and contribute to what’s on the TableSpace 😜; but don’t fear, we need eaters too. This is another fun, stimulating and community building event presented by AirSpace Projects!

Gallery One

Joannou/Cahill

Red Herring

Red Herring ImagesPollyxenia Joannou and Anthony Cahill have been friends and colleagues for the past three and a half decades and despite being in close contact/discourse over this time, they have never brought their practices together in a collaborative fashion.

So, during regular discussions about their work and where each artist saw their work to be heading, it was decided that they should work on a collaboration called Red Herring.

The aim of this collaboration was to explore what they surmised to be the similarities of each other’s work when exhibited side by side having been sight unseen by the other. It was decided that a theme could be used to give connection, a starting point for the exhibition. This connection was to be based on the subject of shadow as both artists felt an affinity to this as a concept and hence, Red Herring was born.

Joannou and Cahill settled on a format, proceeded to their studios and over the past 12 months, have produced this body of work.

Gallery Two

Kendal Heyes

Polynesia

kendal web

Kendal Heyes’ paintings connect to visual experiences associated with Polynesia, in particular, the paintings on velvet of Polynesian women by Edgar Leeteg, popular in the 1930s and 40s, and tapa cloth works, especially the freehand works from Samoa and Niue.

These paintings take from both Leeteg and the Polynesian artists an emphasis on optical effects as an aspect of painting. And like the tapa cloth works they take the form Rosalind Krauss identifies as centripetal grids: ‘Concentrating on the surface of the work as something complete and internally organized,’ each work consists of a series of departures and variations of the grid that frames it.

The Cranny

Francesca Mataraga

stripes and banners

banner-bondi-closeup-w-ocean-low-res

‘stripes and banners’ presents documentation and artefacts from a series of  painting and sculpture projects from 2012 onward.

These works differ in scale, scope and delivery quite broadly but are all based on a set of stripe motifs sourced from a series of fabric patterns. Each work was created for or adapted to a specific site or location and explores different ways of using the stripe motif. Some works are large-scale site-specific paintings or murals, other works are sculptural using domestic architecture – specifically the fence as a visual and physical mode of delivery. Further works have evolved into large-scale banners, literally becoming spatial paintings. All the works function as expanded or spatial paintings, situating the stripe motif in the landscape or in relation to existing architecture where the work in-situ is just as important as it’s photographic image.

Deep Space

Mog&Mog

Future self

Mog&mog aispace

Mog&Mog are multi-disciplinary artists Alexandra Edmondson and Kate Fennell. As a creative partnership encompassing art, design, writing and film-making, they are interested in exploring perceptions of self and marginality of identity. Their new show, Future selfis an immersive installation exploring the formation of identity through storytelling.

4 images from top to bottom: 1. LHS: Anthony Cahill, Cave & Moon #4, 2016, oil on linen, 90 x 90cm. Photo credit: Anthony Cahill. RHS: Pollyxenia Joannou, Shadow Whisper, 2016, oil, pigment on wood, 90 x 90cm. Photo credit: John McRae. 2. Kendal Heyes, Untitled #10, from Polynesia series, 2016, oil and crushed marble on velvet , 120 x 91.4cm. Photo: Kendal Heyes. 3. Francesca Mataraga, ‘photographic documentation of banner for Sculpture by the Sea 2014 (Tamarama)’. Image courtesy the artist. 4: Mog&Mog, Future self, 2016, digital image.

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Saturday 23 July

Ajay Sharma

AirSpace Projects and Ashfield Library

Chai and Cheerio again

Miniature Painting Demo

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SEPTEMBER EXHIBITIONS

Friday 4 – Saturday 19 September 2015

 

Please join us for opening drinks
Saturday 5 September 3.00-5.00pm

 

AirSpace Projects  10 Junction Street   Marrickville   Sydney


GALLERY ONE

Ali Noble Nuha Saad Pink Final

‘Glitter is going under!’ So declared Le Corbusier in his critique of ornament. I like to imagine him emphatically banging a lectern with his fist when he says this, or maybe it’s uttered with a cool and confident voice in a smoky men’s club while sipping whisky. There’s no glitter or gilded edges in our installation; but there is flocking, felt, golden curves and ornament with no formal function.
‘Decadence’, mutters Le Corbusier.


GALLERY TWO

Francesca Mataraga and Merryn J Trevethan

Merryn J TREVETHAN 'seigementality' and Francesca Mataraga 'fence fragment'

Merryn J Trevethan’s work focuses on the uncertainty of perception, using colour to explore the complexity of vision. In this exhibition, Trevethan presents works from her Storm Series of Artist books, objects and recent paintings that distill her daily perceptions and tease out the spatial relationships found in the densely populated architectural environment, as viewed from the 12th storey of her apartment block in Singapore.

Francesca Mataraga presents floor fragment (2015), a sculptural piece and a hypothetical installation. As with other work in this series it explores colour, pattern and form through experimentation with scale, by adapting a pre-existing stripped fabric pattern to an architectural situation.

Image: Merryn J Trevethan, The Siege Mentality, 2015 (left). Francesca Mataraga, floor fragment, 2015 (right). Both images courtesy of the artists.

The Cranny, Deep Space and Outer Space

Sarah Newall: Girl Shed III

Sarahs Work

Girl Shed III is the third iteration and will be the last part to complete the sustainability garden project in the courtyard of AirSpace Projects. Girl Shed is a ramshackle free-form shed designed to provide a creative space and water catchment for the garden. Over the course of the exhibition Sarah Newall will be living onsite creating art that will change and develop the exhibiting space as well as doing daily menial tasks: cleaning, cooking, eating and gardening.

Image courtesy of Sarah Newall.

 Iconoclasts

Opening Friday 6 February 6.00-8.00pm

Coppersmith_Yvette_Arrangement with Grey and Yellow on linen_61cm x 46cm_20142 copy

Yvette Coppersmith
Chelsea Lehmann
Paul Williams
Heidi Yardley

The exhibition Iconoclasts takes the etymology of the word ‘Iconoclast’ literally as a ‘breaker of images’. Artists explore this concept individually and collaboratively with the directive to ‘break’ each other’s images, resulting in paintings that are layered, excavated and ‘Frankensteined’ in the style of exquisite corpse.

 This project is supported by Arts NSW’s NSW Artists’ Grant Scheme, a devolved funding program administered by the National Association of the Visual Arts on behalf of the NSW Government.

NAVA_black_full copy 2

Openings

Friday 6 February – Saturday 21 February

Opening Friday 6 February 6.00-8.00pm

Nuha Saad Column II 2011 copy

AirSpace Projects is expanding it’s exhibition space into the indoor driveway and basement next door. The new development also includes a workshop/seminar area as well as an outdoor courtyard where Sarah Newall is currently undertaking a three-month sustainability project. To celebrate this expansion, we are holding a group exhibition called Openings. Artists will be interpreting the term as they see fit.

Participating artists: Annie Aitken, Susan Andrews, Janine Bailey, Kylie Banyard, Mike Barnard and Jacqui Mills, Ciaran Begley, Robert Bennett, Anthony Cahill, Sue Callanan, Cindy Yuen-Zhe Chen, Leo Coyte, Rox De Luca, Lynda Draper, Michele Elliot, Alex Falkiner, Jan Fieldsend, Natalie Gock, Veronica Habib, Natasha Halicki, Yvette Hamilton, Kendal Heyes, Pollyxenia Joannou, Erin Keys, Deborah Kelly, Hyun-Hee Lee, Glenn Locklee, Fleur MacDonald, Francesca Mataraga, Tony McDonald, Fiona Meller, Jacqui Mills, Sarah Newall, James Nguyen, Anie Nheu, Rafaela Pandolfini, Sue Pedley, Jane Polkinghorne, Emma Price, Margaret Roberts, Catherine Rogers, Nuha Saad, Marlene Sarroff, Kristel Smit, Helen M Sturgess and Sam Valenz

Image Top: Yvette Coppersmith, Arrangement with Grey and Yellow, 2014. Oil on linen, 61cm x 46cm. Image courtesy of the artist.

Image Below: Nuha Saad, Column II, 2011. Acrylic on wood, 63.5 x 29 x 29 cm. Photo credit: Jenni Carter

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