Archives for posts with tag: Exhibitions

I See Queer People

Three Exhibitions

10-25 February 2017

All Welcome

queerfeb2017

Images (clockwise from top left): Kieran Butler, A self-portrait for you, for me, for yoooo, for M and A and Gee too. 2016, Digital image file. Courtesy of the artist. Danica Knezevic, Constant Reflections, 2013, single channel, HD video. Courtesy of the artist. Tim Hilton/Ladonna Rama. Courtesy of the artist. Phil Soliman, The Vast Interior (View from the cave of St Anthony the Great), digital photograph. Courtesy of the artist.

mardi-gras-festival-2017

AirSpace Projects
10 Junction Street, Marrickville
Just 6 minutes easy walk from Marrickville Station

Opening Event

Friday 10 February 6-8pm

Artist Talks

As part of the

Sydney Gay and Lesbian Mardi Gras Festival 2017

Saturday 25 February 3-5pm

Gallery One

Boys don’t cry

Kieran Butler

170105_kb_a-self-portrait-for-you-for-me-for-yoooo-for-m-and-a-and-gee-too-copy-2

Boys don’t cry is a tragic love story, a casual hook-up and an awkward first time. It’s all the feelings you couldn’t say, the coming out you never always wanted and a person you thought you could fall in love with.

Boys don’t cry is about the materialities of love and relationships, the 21st century’s constant stream of information, and the way their associated power relations aid the breakdown and construction of one’s own identity. This exhibition is one instance of how we might work through the endless experiences of being under construction, the questions we ask, the self-doubt we face, the love we feel and the places, real, imagined, semi-fictional or fluid it may take us to; online or offline.

For myself, as a gay man, this has been a long, enduring and seemingly lonely experience, a slow construction of my own identity full of self-doubt. I ask myself questions about masculinity, femininity, LGBTQI colloquial language and popular culture; things I don’t understand, things I want to reject/accept, things I’ve felt removed from yet so close to at the same time. In the digital age materiality points to a mess of diverse factors where materiality itself can be an effect of “an ongoing performance”.[1] In this work I am referring to my own ongoing unsuccessful and semi-fictional performances of love as a homosexual, the identity politics of my own socio-political context and how I navigate them.

I am not the first to say boys don’t cry and this exhibition is by no means definitive of LGBTQI experiences. It is merely one of the many stories that exist in spaces that are real and tangible, sometimes imagined, semi-fictional and fluid.

[1] Lange Berndt, P. Documents of Contemporary Art: Materiality, MIT Press, London, 2015, pg.12

Gallery Two and The Cranny

Disco Infirmo

Trevor Fry
Tina Havelock Stevens
Danica Knesevic
Renny Kodgers
Ladonnarama
Sean Lowry
Daniel Mudie Cunningham
Jane Polkinghorne
Ingrid Stiertzel

Curated by Jane Polkinghorne

4-dknezevic-constantr

Disco conjures a nostalgically, shiny, glamorous past while simultaneously suggesting disco’s collapse into a sparkling hole of excess and ridicule.

Disco Infirmo uses disco in the Australian context as its starting point, remote from the high glamour of the disco era at its peak at Studio 54, New York Operating from Australian vernaculars of ‘secondhandism’, the artists incorporate and infect this imported form, corrupting, mutilating and lionising via Australian cultural anti-glamour.

The artists respond to the sensations that Disco Infirmo evokes – nostalgia, sparkles, nausea, dance fails, Blue Light Discos, ridiculous fashion, rhythmic music, those too old for the dance floor, the bad and almost good dancers, Aussie pub rock discos, and mum and dad dancing inappropriately. Out of time and out of place, and yet the disco continues to be a democratic field for creative expression.

Deep Space

Worse than Animals

Phil Soliman

still-from-worse-than-animals-hd-video-loop-with-sound-2016

In Worse than animals, Melbourne-based multidisciplinary artist Phil Soliman takes the worst insult he has ever endured and shapes it into a powerful symbol of identity. A gloriously psychedelic mashup of pop culture, internet ephemera, ancient Egyptian mythology and house music, this video installation challenges toxic homophobia and other types of othering with humour and insight.

Save

Save

Save

Save

Artists’ Talks

Saturday 17 September  3-5pm

septemberexhibitions2016

10 Junction Street Marrickville

Just 6 minutes walk along Schwebel Street

from Marrickville station

Pollyxenia Joannou, Anthony Cahill, Kendal Heyes, Francesca Mataraga and Mog&Mog will discuss the ideas underpinning their outstanding exhibitions from 3pm. At 4pm tea and home-baked cakes will be served over casual conversation. Everyone is welcome to show-off their prowess in the kitchen and contribute to what’s on the TableSpace 😜; but don’t fear, we need eaters too. This is another fun, stimulating and community building event presented by AirSpace Projects!

Gallery One

Joannou/Cahill

Red Herring

Red Herring ImagesPollyxenia Joannou and Anthony Cahill have been friends and colleagues for the past three and a half decades and despite being in close contact/discourse over this time, they have never brought their practices together in a collaborative fashion.

So, during regular discussions about their work and where each artist saw their work to be heading, it was decided that they should work on a collaboration called Red Herring.

The aim of this collaboration was to explore what they surmised to be the similarities of each other’s work when exhibited side by side having been sight unseen by the other. It was decided that a theme could be used to give connection, a starting point for the exhibition. This connection was to be based on the subject of shadow as both artists felt an affinity to this as a concept and hence, Red Herring was born.

Joannou and Cahill settled on a format, proceeded to their studios and over the past 12 months, have produced this body of work.

Gallery Two

Kendal Heyes

Polynesia

kendal web

Kendal Heyes’ paintings connect to visual experiences associated with Polynesia, in particular, the paintings on velvet of Polynesian women by Edgar Leeteg, popular in the 1930s and 40s, and tapa cloth works, especially the freehand works from Samoa and Niue.

These paintings take from both Leeteg and the Polynesian artists an emphasis on optical effects as an aspect of painting. And like the tapa cloth works they take the form Rosalind Krauss identifies as centripetal grids: ‘Concentrating on the surface of the work as something complete and internally organized,’ each work consists of a series of departures and variations of the grid that frames it.

The Cranny

Francesca Mataraga

stripes and banners

banner-bondi-closeup-w-ocean-low-res

‘stripes and banners’ presents documentation and artefacts from a series of  painting and sculpture projects from 2012 onward.

These works differ in scale, scope and delivery quite broadly but are all based on a set of stripe motifs sourced from a series of fabric patterns. Each work was created for or adapted to a specific site or location and explores different ways of using the stripe motif. Some works are large-scale site-specific paintings or murals, other works are sculptural using domestic architecture – specifically the fence as a visual and physical mode of delivery. Further works have evolved into large-scale banners, literally becoming spatial paintings. All the works function as expanded or spatial paintings, situating the stripe motif in the landscape or in relation to existing architecture where the work in-situ is just as important as it’s photographic image.

Deep Space

Mog&Mog

Future self

Mog&mog aispace

Mog&Mog are multi-disciplinary artists Alexandra Edmondson and Kate Fennell. As a creative partnership encompassing art, design, writing and film-making, they are interested in exploring perceptions of self and marginality of identity. Their new show, Future selfis an immersive installation exploring the formation of identity through storytelling.

4 images from top to bottom: 1. LHS: Anthony Cahill, Cave & Moon #4, 2016, oil on linen, 90 x 90cm. Photo credit: Anthony Cahill. RHS: Pollyxenia Joannou, Shadow Whisper, 2016, oil, pigment on wood, 90 x 90cm. Photo credit: John McRae. 2. Kendal Heyes, Untitled #10, from Polynesia series, 2016, oil and crushed marble on velvet , 120 x 91.4cm. Photo: Kendal Heyes. 3. Francesca Mataraga, ‘photographic documentation of banner for Sculpture by the Sea 2014 (Tamarama)’. Image courtesy the artist. 4: Mog&Mog, Future self, 2016, digital image.

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Saturday 23 July

Ajay Sharma

AirSpace Projects and Ashfield Library

Chai and Cheerio again

Miniature Painting Demo

Save

SEPTEMBER EXHIBITIONS

Friday 4 – Saturday 19 September 2015

 

Please join us for opening drinks
Saturday 5 September 3.00-5.00pm

 

AirSpace Projects  10 Junction Street   Marrickville   Sydney


GALLERY ONE

Ali Noble Nuha Saad Pink Final

‘Glitter is going under!’ So declared Le Corbusier in his critique of ornament. I like to imagine him emphatically banging a lectern with his fist when he says this, or maybe it’s uttered with a cool and confident voice in a smoky men’s club while sipping whisky. There’s no glitter or gilded edges in our installation; but there is flocking, felt, golden curves and ornament with no formal function.
‘Decadence’, mutters Le Corbusier.


GALLERY TWO

Francesca Mataraga and Merryn J Trevethan

Merryn J TREVETHAN 'seigementality' and Francesca Mataraga 'fence fragment'

Merryn J Trevethan’s work focuses on the uncertainty of perception, using colour to explore the complexity of vision. In this exhibition, Trevethan presents works from her Storm Series of Artist books, objects and recent paintings that distill her daily perceptions and tease out the spatial relationships found in the densely populated architectural environment, as viewed from the 12th storey of her apartment block in Singapore.

Francesca Mataraga presents floor fragment (2015), a sculptural piece and a hypothetical installation. As with other work in this series it explores colour, pattern and form through experimentation with scale, by adapting a pre-existing stripped fabric pattern to an architectural situation.

Image: Merryn J Trevethan, The Siege Mentality, 2015 (left). Francesca Mataraga, floor fragment, 2015 (right). Both images courtesy of the artists.

The Cranny, Deep Space and Outer Space

Sarah Newall: Girl Shed III

Sarahs Work

Girl Shed III is the third iteration and will be the last part to complete the sustainability garden project in the courtyard of AirSpace Projects. Girl Shed is a ramshackle free-form shed designed to provide a creative space and water catchment for the garden. Over the course of the exhibition Sarah Newall will be living onsite creating art that will change and develop the exhibiting space as well as doing daily menial tasks: cleaning, cooking, eating and gardening.

Image courtesy of Sarah Newall.

 Iconoclasts

Opening Friday 6 February 6.00-8.00pm

Coppersmith_Yvette_Arrangement with Grey and Yellow on linen_61cm x 46cm_20142 copy

Yvette Coppersmith
Chelsea Lehmann
Paul Williams
Heidi Yardley

The exhibition Iconoclasts takes the etymology of the word ‘Iconoclast’ literally as a ‘breaker of images’. Artists explore this concept individually and collaboratively with the directive to ‘break’ each other’s images, resulting in paintings that are layered, excavated and ‘Frankensteined’ in the style of exquisite corpse.

 This project is supported by Arts NSW’s NSW Artists’ Grant Scheme, a devolved funding program administered by the National Association of the Visual Arts on behalf of the NSW Government.

NAVA_black_full copy 2

Openings

Friday 6 February – Saturday 21 February

Opening Friday 6 February 6.00-8.00pm

Nuha Saad Column II 2011 copy

AirSpace Projects is expanding it’s exhibition space into the indoor driveway and basement next door. The new development also includes a workshop/seminar area as well as an outdoor courtyard where Sarah Newall is currently undertaking a three-month sustainability project. To celebrate this expansion, we are holding a group exhibition called Openings. Artists will be interpreting the term as they see fit.

Participating artists: Annie Aitken, Susan Andrews, Janine Bailey, Kylie Banyard, Mike Barnard and Jacqui Mills, Ciaran Begley, Robert Bennett, Anthony Cahill, Sue Callanan, Cindy Yuen-Zhe Chen, Leo Coyte, Rox De Luca, Lynda Draper, Michele Elliot, Alex Falkiner, Jan Fieldsend, Natalie Gock, Veronica Habib, Natasha Halicki, Yvette Hamilton, Kendal Heyes, Pollyxenia Joannou, Erin Keys, Deborah Kelly, Hyun-Hee Lee, Glenn Locklee, Fleur MacDonald, Francesca Mataraga, Tony McDonald, Fiona Meller, Jacqui Mills, Sarah Newall, James Nguyen, Anie Nheu, Rafaela Pandolfini, Sue Pedley, Jane Polkinghorne, Emma Price, Margaret Roberts, Catherine Rogers, Nuha Saad, Marlene Sarroff, Kristel Smit, Helen M Sturgess and Sam Valenz

Image Top: Yvette Coppersmith, Arrangement with Grey and Yellow, 2014. Oil on linen, 61cm x 46cm. Image courtesy of the artist.

Image Below: Nuha Saad, Column II, 2011. Acrylic on wood, 63.5 x 29 x 29 cm. Photo credit: Jenni Carter

We have been busy behind the scenes at AirSpace Projects preparing for the expansion of our space into the indoor driveway and basement next door. It’s been a lot of hard work but we’re almost there! Frank ter Meulen of Dutch Touch did a sterling job building platforms, stairs and walls, we couldn’t have asked for a better job. Then the painting day working bee got underway. Huge thanks to James Nyugen, Veronica Habib, Veronica Shen, Ciaron Begley, Janine Bailey and George. Sally has been refining her concreting skills to fill in various gaps and has just one more coat of paint to do on the floors before it’s pretty much done.

wBeeBrenda Factor feeds the workers

There will be three new exhibition spaces to add to the main gallery: Gallery Two, The Cranny and Deep Space. The spaces vary in size and can be reserved individually or in groupings. We have already received inquiries and while we have not yet called for proposals and uploaded information to our blog, we are accepting proposals and are very happy to discuss the conditions and your ideas with you. Information coming soon on the blog!

We now also have a permanent workshop area. Li Wenmin and her Drawing Through Journey class has tested out the new workshop area and if the resulting drawings are any indication, the space is working brilliantly!

Upcoming Workshops – Soon!

Alex Falkiner will be running her ever-popular workshops Drawing With Thread (un-embroidery) on Sunday 25 January 1.00-4.00pm and Stitching Off The Page (fancy edgings) on Saturday 31 January from 1.00-4.00pm.

logo

For more information and bookings check eventbrite:

http://www.eventbrite.com.au/e/drawing-with-thread-un-embroidery-tickets-14971832153?aff=erelexporg

http://www.eventbrite.com.au/e/stitching-off-the-page-fancy-edgings-tickets-14971698754?aff=erelexporg


 

Exhibitions

This year’s exhibition program will be commencing with two exhibitions both opening on

Friday 6 February 6.00-8.00pm

Iconoclasts

Lehmann_Berlin.82x75.5cmjpg copy

Yvette Coppersmith
Chelsea Lehmann
Paul Williams
Heidi Yardley

The exhibition Iconoclasts takes the etymology of the word ‘Iconoclast’ literally as a ‘breaker of images’. Artists explore this concept individually and collaboratively with the directive to ‘break’ each other’s images, resulting in paintings that are layered, excavated and ‘Frankensteined’ in the style of exquisite corpse.

Image above: Chelsea Lehmann, Berlin, 201-14. Oil and resin on linen, 82 x 75.5cm. Image courtesy of the artist

**************************************

Openings

 To celebrate the opening of the new spaces we are holding a group exhibition where artists choose to respond to the term ‘openings’ in any way they see fit.

Artists include Annie Aitken, Susan Andrews, Janine Bailey, Kylie Banyard, Ciaron Begley, Robert Bennett, Anthony Cahill, Cindy Chen,  Leo Coyte, Rox De Luca, Lynda Draper, Nat Gock, Veronica Habib, Yvette Hamilton, Kendal Heyes, Pollyxenia Joannou, Erin Keys, Hyun-Hee Lee, Glenn Locklee, Fleur MacDonald, Francesca Mataraga, Jacqui Mills and Mike Barnard, Sarah Newall, James Nguyen, Anie Nheu, Emma Price, Catherine Rogers, Nuha Saad, Marlene Sarroff, Kristel Smit, Helen Sturgess …

More on this exhibition coming soon …


Courtyard Residency

Sarah Newall is undertaking a three-month residency from February until the end of April to transform the dilapidated courtyard at the rear of AirSpace Projects into a sustainable gardening project. Where possible she is using recycled materials and even recycling an artwork donated by Francesca Mataraga! The garden will be a work-in-progress and you are welcome to visit during openings and opening hours.

Sarah 1

 


Contemporary Art and Feminism

Art, Feminism, Australia, Now

Ray Filar

Journalist, writer, editor

Art Sleuth

Delving into the murky depths of the contemporary London art scene

Broad Strokes: The National Museum of Women in the Arts' Blog

The National Museum of Women in the Arts is the only museum in the world dedicated exclusively to recognizing the contributions of women artists.

Art F City

New York art news and reviews.

www.unmagazine.org/

Just another WordPress.com site

Marrickville Garage

An artist space in Marrickville in our garage