Archives for posts with tag: Kendal Heyes

Artists’ Talks

Saturday 17 September  3-5pm

septemberexhibitions2016

10 Junction Street Marrickville

Just 6 minutes walk along Schwebel Street

from Marrickville station

Pollyxenia Joannou, Anthony Cahill, Kendal Heyes, Francesca Mataraga and Mog&Mog will discuss the ideas underpinning their outstanding exhibitions from 3pm. At 4pm tea and home-baked cakes will be served over casual conversation. Everyone is welcome to show-off their prowess in the kitchen and contribute to what’s on the TableSpace 😜; but don’t fear, we need eaters too. This is another fun, stimulating and community building event presented by AirSpace Projects!

Gallery One

Joannou/Cahill

Red Herring

Red Herring ImagesPollyxenia Joannou and Anthony Cahill have been friends and colleagues for the past three and a half decades and despite being in close contact/discourse over this time, they have never brought their practices together in a collaborative fashion.

So, during regular discussions about their work and where each artist saw their work to be heading, it was decided that they should work on a collaboration called Red Herring.

The aim of this collaboration was to explore what they surmised to be the similarities of each other’s work when exhibited side by side having been sight unseen by the other. It was decided that a theme could be used to give connection, a starting point for the exhibition. This connection was to be based on the subject of shadow as both artists felt an affinity to this as a concept and hence, Red Herring was born.

Joannou and Cahill settled on a format, proceeded to their studios and over the past 12 months, have produced this body of work.

Gallery Two

Kendal Heyes

Polynesia

kendal web

Kendal Heyes’ paintings connect to visual experiences associated with Polynesia, in particular, the paintings on velvet of Polynesian women by Edgar Leeteg, popular in the 1930s and 40s, and tapa cloth works, especially the freehand works from Samoa and Niue.

These paintings take from both Leeteg and the Polynesian artists an emphasis on optical effects as an aspect of painting. And like the tapa cloth works they take the form Rosalind Krauss identifies as centripetal grids: ‘Concentrating on the surface of the work as something complete and internally organized,’ each work consists of a series of departures and variations of the grid that frames it.

The Cranny

Francesca Mataraga

stripes and banners

banner-bondi-closeup-w-ocean-low-res

‘stripes and banners’ presents documentation and artefacts from a series of  painting and sculpture projects from 2012 onward.

These works differ in scale, scope and delivery quite broadly but are all based on a set of stripe motifs sourced from a series of fabric patterns. Each work was created for or adapted to a specific site or location and explores different ways of using the stripe motif. Some works are large-scale site-specific paintings or murals, other works are sculptural using domestic architecture – specifically the fence as a visual and physical mode of delivery. Further works have evolved into large-scale banners, literally becoming spatial paintings. All the works function as expanded or spatial paintings, situating the stripe motif in the landscape or in relation to existing architecture where the work in-situ is just as important as it’s photographic image.

Deep Space

Mog&Mog

Future self

Mog&mog aispace

Mog&Mog are multi-disciplinary artists Alexandra Edmondson and Kate Fennell. As a creative partnership encompassing art, design, writing and film-making, they are interested in exploring perceptions of self and marginality of identity. Their new show, Future selfis an immersive installation exploring the formation of identity through storytelling.

4 images from top to bottom: 1. LHS: Anthony Cahill, Cave & Moon #4, 2016, oil on linen, 90 x 90cm. Photo credit: Anthony Cahill. RHS: Pollyxenia Joannou, Shadow Whisper, 2016, oil, pigment on wood, 90 x 90cm. Photo credit: John McRae. 2. Kendal Heyes, Untitled #10, from Polynesia series, 2016, oil and crushed marble on velvet , 120 x 91.4cm. Photo: Kendal Heyes. 3. Francesca Mataraga, ‘photographic documentation of banner for Sculpture by the Sea 2014 (Tamarama)’. Image courtesy the artist. 4: Mog&Mog, Future self, 2016, digital image.

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Chai and Cheerio

On Saturday 16 May we will see the closing of two wonderful exhibitions

Ajay Sharma:Past Continuous

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And

Screen Memories: Photographs by Kendal Heyes

screen-memories-2-W copy

Ajay will soon be returning to his studio in Jaipur and Kendal will be making the journey back down the escarpment to the Illawarra.

To celebrate both exhibitions and to give everyone the opportunity to say good-bye to Ajay, and to Kendal, and even hello, we are going to cook up a big pot of delicious chai. This is your chance to catch the final hours of Past Continuous and Screen Memories and to see the incredible accomplishments of Ajay’s students.

Saturday 16 May, 3.30 – 5.00pm

AirSpace Projects, 10 Junction Street, Marrickville

ALL WELCOME!

 

Top image: Ajay Sharma, Hunting Scene, 2015. Image Courtesy of the Artist
Image below: Kendal Heyes, Untitled (Curtain III), 2014. Image courtesy of the Artist.

Two exhibitions opening at AirSpace Projects on Friday 1 May 6.00-8.00pm

Ajay Sharma

Past Continuous

Ajay Sharma coat copy

 To be opened by Dr Diane Losche, UNSW | Art and Design,
after the Puja ceremony at 6.30pm.
Performance of Indian classical music by
Manbir Singh (vocal), Inderpreet Singh (vocal and harmonium) and Ranbir Singh (tabla).

We are thrilled to announce that Ajay Sharma is returning to Sydney from Jaipur for his second solo exhibition, Past Continuous, at AirSpace Projects. He will be exhibiting a unique series of works as well as paintings in the Indian miniature painting tradition.

In the series Past Continuous, Ajay Sharma expresses his love and respect for the wonderful legacy of traditions handed down by his ancestors: ‘It is still very much part of us, part of our culture and of our identity.’ Yet all around him Ajay Sharma is witness to the decay of these traditions and the destruction of the exquisite remnants of the past as India undergoes rapid modernisation and social change. His work provides a profound commentary on the collision of old and new and poses the question as to whether or not anything can be done to save this legacy.


Screen Memories

Photographs by Kendal Heyes

 

4-s_w13_00Toyama-W copy

This series takes its title from Freud’s term ‘screen memory’, used to describe a vivid but banal memory that functions to hide another, more traumatic one. The series also plays with other ideas related to screens and memory-images, and how one image can give rise to another through association. Screen Memories uses contemporary and historical photographs in a series in which images from different times and places interact, creating an interplay of narratives within the gallery space.

 

Top Image: Ajay Sharma, 2015. Image courtesy of the Artist.

Bottom Image: Kendal heyes, 2015. Image Coutesy of the Artist.


 

 

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