Archives for the month of: August, 2014

MiniatureCosmosInvite2

BonsaiDemoFlyer

Miniature Cosmos

An exhibition of new work by

Cindy Yuen-Zhe Chen & Kristel Smits

Curated by Kathleen Linn

5 September – 20 September 2014

Opening night

Friday 5 September 6.00 – 8.00pm

At 7.00pm there will be a performance by Alison Bennett and Kate Brown who will be responding to Cindy Yuen-Zhe Chen’s installation.

Creating order out of disorder is something that has fascinated artists, scholars and musicians for thousands of years across different cultures. The garden as a way of creating order and beauty in our surrounds is manifested in different ways around the world, reflecting the larger aesthetic and cultural concerns of a society. The strict lines and formalism of many European gardens contrast with Chinese and Japanese ideas that allow for meandering paths, a harmony with natural shapes, the discovery of hidden views or sparse surrounds that intend to cultivate spaces of the mind rather than living plants.

For Cindy Yuen-Zhe Chen and Kristel Smits aspects of Chinese and Japanese gardens have provided a source of inspiration as well as a conceptual path of enquiry in their work. Miniature Cosmos intends to delve a little deeper into this and other aspects of these two emerging artists’ practices.

Maple Magic II -for Airspace website Smits  Kristel Smits, Maple Magic II

 

Kristel Smits’ mixed-media works on paper draw strongly on childhood experiences and personal interpretations of place. Her works in Miniature Cosmos are inspired by visits to Japanese gardens, both in the Sydney suburb of Auburn and in the Netherlands (The Hague), on her recent travels. Through a delicate and meticulous working process that she has been developing since 2007, her series of sepia-toned drawings are strongly evocative of memory while also possessing a mysterious, dream-like element. They contrast with her more highly coloured series of drawings, which take inspiration from botanical studies to create detailed renderings of individual plants, or carefully chosen garden views, set against dense Dutch woodlands. Her drawings will be exhibited alongside bonsai specimens, adding to the depth perceptions within the work.

A Drawn Out Moment Detail Web Chen  Cindy Yuen-Zhe Chen, A Drawn Out Moment (detail)

 

Cindy Yuen-Zhe Chen’s drawings have their origins in invisible phenomena. Her works form a personal response to natural sounds such as bird calls, the distant rumble of traffic or insect sounds observed at specific times of day. Her work explores the inner line of things that have no form. Taking Japanese ink on Chinese paper as her primary working tools, her drawings can be understood as a form of abstract musical graphic notation. For the opening night of Miniature Cosmos Cindy will, for the first time, be working with two performance artists – Kate Brown and Alison Bennett. They will create a performance-based dialogue with Cindy’s ink drawings, returning the work once again to the aural realm.

Miniature Cosmos features bonsai created by Thor Beowulf of the Bonsai Design Studio in Woollahra. We welcome you to attend the two Bonsai Demonstrations occurring at Airspace Projects as part of the wider program for the exhibition.

Exhibition is open for viewing from 11.00am Friday 5 September and runs to 5.00pm Saturday 20 September.

Marilyn Schneider

Lifestyle Display

Friday 22 August – Saturday 30 August

Opening Thursday 21 August, 6.00pm – 8.00pm

M.Schneider, Mega Mansion, 2012 low resMarilyn Schneider, Mega Mansion, 2012. Foam core, DVD cases, Chroma key paint, cardboard, 150 x 60 x 75 cm.

 

For Lifestyle Display Marilyn Schneider uses sculptural installation to examine the visual language of surfaces and logos in commercial spaces. These reconstructions critique the generic aesthetic looks and stylistic attitudes that present the viewer with a seemingly excessive display of wealth and status.

Using imagery derived from luxury trade shows, celebrity homes and high-end fashion stores, the installation investigates what the spectaculisation of the urban landscape reveals about our culture. Synthetic and industrial materials are used to create imitations that critique how different forms of artifice attempt to manipulate the subject in the public sphere.

Glenn Locklee has written a lovely positive review of Anie Nheu and Jan Fieldsend’s exhibition Playbox: sixtoeight

Playbox continues from Thursday 7 August to Saturday 9 August and again from 14 to 16 August, 11.00am to 6.00pm Thursday/Friday and to 5.00pm Saturday.

Problem Child
Anie Nheu, Problem Child, 2014. Acrylic paint on wire mesh. Photo credit: AirSpace Projects.

Jan Fieldsend
Jan Fieldsend, Quick Sketch, Swan, 2014. Paoers – carbon, crepe, found japanese woodblock. Photo credit: AirSpace Projects.

And just in case you want to know what it’s all about:

Sydney artists Anie Nheu and Jan Fieldsend work independently then collaboratively to bring together a collection of unlikely objects and materials to stunning effect. While the title Playbox holds childhood associations, this exhibition delves into adult considerations of bodies, emotions, memories and inter-cultural space. Seductive hand painted and drawn surfaces are juxtaposed against industrial and manufactured materials that carry signifiers of culture, place and history. The result is a sophisticated installation crafted with intense deliberation and intelligence.

Informed by the thoughts of the Japanese school of thought Mono-ha (Nheu) and the practice of Ikebana (Fieldsend), extensive time and attention has been paid to the arrangement of things to provide a multi-sensorial experience. Western art history has not been overlooked and references to Minimalism, the Pattern and Decoration Movement and Abstraction abound.

While there is a strong sense of play and collaboration in this installation, playmates Nheu and Fieldsend have left behind a sense of nostalgia, and an emotional residue that is unsettling but fascinating. Works titled Problem Child, Disassembled Monument for a Slow-Motion Dancer and The Tooth Fairy are all shaped and placed in such a way that that it leaves no doubt that this installation is not a consequence of child’s play.

 

Anie Nheu and Jan Fieldsend

 

11.00am Friday 1 August – 5.00pm Saturday 16 August 2014

Anie Nheu Playbox image 1
Anie Nheu, Crepuscule, 2014. Oil on board, 30 x 25cm. Image Credit: AirSpace Projects

Opening tonight: 6.00 – 8.00pm, 10 Junction Street, Marrickville.

Sydney artists Anie Nheu and Jan Fieldsend work independently then collaboratively to bring together a collection of unlikely objects and materials to stunning effect. While the title Playbox holds childhood associations, this exhibition delves into adult considerations of bodies, emotions, memories and inter-cultural space. Seductive hand painted and drawn surfaces are juxtaposed against industrial and manufactured materials that carry signifiers of culture, place and history. The result is a sophisticated installation crafted with intense deliberation and intelligence.

Informed by the thoughts of the Japanese school of thought Mono-ha (Nheu) and the practice of Ikebana (Fieldsend), extensive time and attention has been paid to the arrangement of things to provide a multi-sensorial experience. Western art history has not been overlooked and references to Minimalism, the Pattern and Decoration Movement and Abstraction abound.

While there is a strong sense of play and collaboration in this installation, playmates Nheu and Fieldsend have left behind a sense of nostalgia, and an emotional residue that is unsettling but fascinating. Works titled Problem Child, Disassembled Monument for a Slow-Motion Dancer and The Tooth Fairy are all shaped and placed in such a way that that it leaves no doubt that this installation is not a consequence of child’s play.

Contemporary Art and Feminism

Art, Feminism, Australia, Now

Ray Filar

Journalist, writer, editor

Art Sleuth

Delving into the murky depths of the contemporary London art scene

Broad Strokes: The National Museum of Women in the Arts' Blog

The National Museum of Women in the Arts is the only museum in the world dedicated exclusively to recognizing the contributions of women artists.

Art F City

New York art news and reviews.

www.unmagazine.org/

Just another WordPress.com site

Marrickville Garage

An artist space in Marrickville in our garage