Archives for posts with tag: Anie Nheu

Join us for

ARTIST TALKS

Saturday 20 August 2pm

The final day of the August exhibitions

10 Junction Street Marrickville

August2016FB
Join artists Anie Nheu, Sarah Mufford, Sally Clarke, Brenda Factor and Sara Sohrabian for art talks that delve into topics ranging from the psychology of the displaced body to tessellation and the geometric ratio of 2:1:2:1:2; from inscribed skins and unintended consequences to the formation of dual identity.

The talks will be followed by relaxed conversation over tea and baking concepts presented on TableSpace downstairs, a normally dull space that transforms into a gustatory spectacle on the third Saturday of every month. Why not demonstrate your prowess in the kitchen and participate in this highly coveted exhibition opportunity? We can only encourage you!

 

Image above: August exhibitions. LtoR: Details of works by Anie Nheu, Sarah Mufford, Brenda Factor and Sara Sohrabian.

August Exhibitions

Friday 5 – Saturday 20 August

Opening Event: Friday 5 August 6-8pm

Gallery One

Anie Nheu

Forms on Edge

Double edged_2016_mixed media on design board_56.5x17cm copy

One of the ideas that sustains Anie Nheu’s visual exploration is the relationship the body forms to the space it inhabits. ‘Relationship’ encapsulates the experiences of a body in a myriad of affect and effects, both tangible and intangible. The background narrative is told through a female body of a perpetual migrant who was born into a predominately patriarchal culture. Resettlement and adaptation brought changes in traditionally assigned roles. Negotiations for place and roles in new communities and at a micro level within the family were acutely felt. These ideas form the basis of the visual framework for the exhibition.

Gallery Two

Sarah Mufford

Repeat

Catalunya Diagonal detail copy

Sarah Mufford’s practice explores intuitive, abstract expressionistic technique juxtaposed with mathematical patterning of circular, sacred geometry derived from Eastern and Western methodologies. It is an acknowledgment of the history of abstraction and uses ritual as both process and philosophical driving force.

Overlapping, repeated circle tessellations form grids emphasising spatial relationships within the composition. The resulting four segmented star-like shapes painted in opaque white and transparent rose reference the mathematical process that Giotto and his Bottega employed in decorative sections such as fabric drapery and also in the manner with which he devised the gold star ceiling of the Scrovegni chapel in Padua, Italy. This geometric ratio is 2:1:2:1:2, or “One Between Two”.

It is also found in traditional Indian Miniature painting and used as a ritualistic mantra and methodology in the depiction of any kind of organisational, decorative pattern from leaf and flower shapes, to fabric, brickwork, carpet and flooring. In Repeat Mufford uses this method of sacred geometry to organise the pattern of tiny plant references, gold leaf work and grid.

The Cranny

Sally Clarke and Brenda Factor

Beast People

SiliconSkinBFAP800

Inspired by Dr Moreau’s experimental lab, Clarke and Factor combine, by way of a metaphorical vivisection, their practices and materials to create a hybrid installation of materials and ideas. Clarke literally references the scientist’s laboratory with a suggestion of unintended consequences while Factor produces skins impregnated with medieval imagery of fantastical creatures.

Deep Space

Sara Sohrabian

Rapture/Rupture

Web image, Rupture-Rapture #5

Rupture/Rapture addresses the inevitability of change while acknowledging the strong hold that memory can hold over the present. For migrants, who have lost a direct connection to their culture and to the ties of their past, identity shifts between a duality. While embracing the many aspects of a new culture, a feeling of isolation, division and dislocation can ensue. Rupture/Rapture explores these complex feelings.

Images Top to Bottom: Anie Nheu, Double-Edged, 2016, mixed media on design board, 56.5 x 17cm. Image credit: Anie Nheu; Sarah Mufford: Catalunya (detail), 2016. Image courtesy of the artist; Brenda Factor, Skins, 2016, silicon, various dimensions. Image courtesy of the artist; Sara Sohrabian, Rupture/Rapture 5, 2015. Image Courtesy of the artist.

Save

Intimate Worlds, featuring the work of Fleur MacDonald, Stephanie Monteith, Anie Nheu, Catherine Rogers and Kaye Shumack continues until December 20. It’s a beautiful and reflective exhibition to end the year on. Read Glenn Locklee’s review in sixtoeight.

we watched as she did her handstand single handedly copy

But the action doesn’t stop there.

Check out our January Drawing Workshops! 

In January Li Wenmin will be running two fabulous workshops Drawing For Beginners and Drawing Through Journey in the soon to be opened workshop area. Check Workshops on our menu for more information.

Wenmin is a practising artist who specialises in drawing. She trained in Beijing and has acquired a PhD (Fine Arts) from the College of Fine Arts, UNSW. Wenmin has been teaching at a tertiary level for well over ten years and is well positioned to not only assist you to acquire skills in drawing but also to build an understanding of what drawing is and the role of drawing in contemporary art today. Li Wenmin is represented by Flinders Street Gallery.

Alex Falkiner will also be re-running her popular Drawing With Thread and Stitching Off The Page on 25 and 31 January respectively. More details to come.

AirSpace Projects will be opening again on Friday 6 February 2015 with Iconoclasts. Stay tuned for details.

Image Above: Anie Nheu, We watched as she did a handstand single handedly, 2014. Mixed media, variable dimensions. Photo credit: Anie Nheu

AirSpace Projects will now be closed until Friday 5 December when we will be opening the last exhibition of what was a fabulous year.

Intimate Worlds

5 December – 20 December

Fleur MacDonald IMG_1586 copy

Featuring the work of Fleur MacDonald, Stephanie Monteith, Anie Nheu, Catherine Rogers and Kaye Shumack

Opening Friday 5 December 6.00 – 8.00pm

Through both the medium and discourse of paint five artists draw the viewer close to engage with intimate spaces and scales, from the ordinary to the extraordinary.

Come and enjoy the work of these wonderful artists and their varied approaches to the medium of paint.

Image: Fleur MacDonald, Giorgio Pengee failed his audition to be the next Dr Who and has decided to set his sights on Starfleet instead, 2014. Gouache on wood panel, 40 x 40cm. Photo credit: Fleur MacDonald.

Glenn Locklee has written a lovely positive review of Anie Nheu and Jan Fieldsend’s exhibition Playbox: sixtoeight

Playbox continues from Thursday 7 August to Saturday 9 August and again from 14 to 16 August, 11.00am to 6.00pm Thursday/Friday and to 5.00pm Saturday.

Problem Child
Anie Nheu, Problem Child, 2014. Acrylic paint on wire mesh. Photo credit: AirSpace Projects.

Jan Fieldsend
Jan Fieldsend, Quick Sketch, Swan, 2014. Paoers – carbon, crepe, found japanese woodblock. Photo credit: AirSpace Projects.

And just in case you want to know what it’s all about:

Sydney artists Anie Nheu and Jan Fieldsend work independently then collaboratively to bring together a collection of unlikely objects and materials to stunning effect. While the title Playbox holds childhood associations, this exhibition delves into adult considerations of bodies, emotions, memories and inter-cultural space. Seductive hand painted and drawn surfaces are juxtaposed against industrial and manufactured materials that carry signifiers of culture, place and history. The result is a sophisticated installation crafted with intense deliberation and intelligence.

Informed by the thoughts of the Japanese school of thought Mono-ha (Nheu) and the practice of Ikebana (Fieldsend), extensive time and attention has been paid to the arrangement of things to provide a multi-sensorial experience. Western art history has not been overlooked and references to Minimalism, the Pattern and Decoration Movement and Abstraction abound.

While there is a strong sense of play and collaboration in this installation, playmates Nheu and Fieldsend have left behind a sense of nostalgia, and an emotional residue that is unsettling but fascinating. Works titled Problem Child, Disassembled Monument for a Slow-Motion Dancer and The Tooth Fairy are all shaped and placed in such a way that that it leaves no doubt that this installation is not a consequence of child’s play.

 

Anie Nheu and Jan Fieldsend

 

11.00am Friday 1 August – 5.00pm Saturday 16 August 2014

Anie Nheu Playbox image 1
Anie Nheu, Crepuscule, 2014. Oil on board, 30 x 25cm. Image Credit: AirSpace Projects

Opening tonight: 6.00 – 8.00pm, 10 Junction Street, Marrickville.

Sydney artists Anie Nheu and Jan Fieldsend work independently then collaboratively to bring together a collection of unlikely objects and materials to stunning effect. While the title Playbox holds childhood associations, this exhibition delves into adult considerations of bodies, emotions, memories and inter-cultural space. Seductive hand painted and drawn surfaces are juxtaposed against industrial and manufactured materials that carry signifiers of culture, place and history. The result is a sophisticated installation crafted with intense deliberation and intelligence.

Informed by the thoughts of the Japanese school of thought Mono-ha (Nheu) and the practice of Ikebana (Fieldsend), extensive time and attention has been paid to the arrangement of things to provide a multi-sensorial experience. Western art history has not been overlooked and references to Minimalism, the Pattern and Decoration Movement and Abstraction abound.

While there is a strong sense of play and collaboration in this installation, playmates Nheu and Fieldsend have left behind a sense of nostalgia, and an emotional residue that is unsettling but fascinating. Works titled Problem Child, Disassembled Monument for a Slow-Motion Dancer and The Tooth Fairy are all shaped and placed in such a way that that it leaves no doubt that this installation is not a consequence of child’s play.

Playbox

An installation of disparate works

by

Anie Nheu and Jan Fieldsend

Opens 6.00 – 8.00pm Friday 1 August

Pbox1 Invite image

Image: © 2014 Anie Nheu and Janice Fieldsend

Exhibition runs from

Friday 1 August to Saturday 16 August

Contemporary Art and Feminism

Art, Feminism, Australia, Now

CoUNTesses

The First Four Years

The First Four Years

Ray Filar

Journalist, writer, editor

openDemocracy

The First Four Years

Art Sleuth

Delving into the murky depths of the contemporary London art scene

Broad Strokes: The National Museum of Women in the Arts' Blog

The National Museum of Women in the Arts is the only museum in the world dedicated exclusively to recognizing the contributions of women artists.

Art F City

New York art news and reviews.

Wexner Center for the Arts

The First Four Years

Frieze

The First Four Years

www.unmagazine.org/

Just another WordPress.com site

Marrickville Garage

An artist space in Marrickville in our garage

The Art Life

The First Four Years

AirSpace Projects 2014-2017

The First Four Years