Archives for posts with tag: Airspace Projects

June Exhibitions

Save the Date

Artist Talks and Arvo Tea

Saturday 17 June 3-5pm

GALLERY ONE

When one of my favourite authors, Siri Hustvedt, wrote an essay, My Louise Bourgeois, about one of my favourite artists, I got a little excited. Emotional, even. Louise Bourgeois has become the poster-grrl for many women artists, embodying and transcending the moniker of Confessional Artist. Woman Artist. Confessional Woman Artist. Mother. Difficult Woman. Hustvedt’s essay is the catalyst for My Emotionalism; an exhibition where the primary mutual endeavour of the artists gathered is to translate emotional states. And more.

Read Ali Noble’s full essay here

GALLERY TWO

Susan Andrews

Off-centre

Susan Andrews, Off-centre, acrylic on ply 2016, 63 x 39 x 5cm. Photo: Marilena Garcia, Blank Canvas Co.

Off-centre in the conventional sense implies that someone or something is not balanced, displaced in space or surface. To reflect some order back into the equation, I chose to work with units of equal measurement but of variable proportion such as the square, rectangle and triangle. By working with these compatible systems of unity, but of varying proportion and scale, I was then able to juxtapose and reconfigure each piece to convey an array of irregular and unfamiliar forms.

THE CRANNY

Tracey Clement

Metropolis Experiment

Tracey Clement, Metropolis Experiment I, 2016-17, rusty steel, salt, laboratory glass, cotton, dimensions variable (max height 200cm). Photo: Tracey Clement

 

A sculptural installation consisting of approximately 20-40 rusty steel structures (40-200cm high each), LOTS of salt crystals, lots of laboratory glass.

It’s the unholy love child of an architectural model and a chemistry experiment: a ruined model city, a metaphor.

Read full description and biography here

DEEP SPACE

Lydia Balbal

Mangala Country

Lydia Balbal, Bin Bin, acrylic on canvas, 122 x 76cm. Image courtesy of the artist and Short Street Gallery, WA.

Lydia Balbal is a Mangala woman. She was married to the Yulparija artist Nabiru Bullen until his death in 2009. Lydia’s country is near Punmu in the Great Sandy Desert of W.A. Her people’s existence was threatened by severe drought so that they had little choice but to leave their traditional country. Her family were some of the last to walk out to the coastal town of Bidyadanga (then La Grange Mission) located two hours south of Broome in the early 70s. Lydia first began painting in 2007 but has already received significant attention from collectors and the media alike.
See more works here

Lydia Balbal is represented by Short Street Gallery, Broome.

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Sunday Morning Yoga 

with Gillian Lavery

9-10am

on 14, 21, 28 May and 4 June

April Art Talks

Saturday 22 April 3-5pm

Join us for the next round of artist talks by Vilma Bader, Sarah Eddowes and Rebecca Shanahan (Paula do Prado’s exhibition is up but sadly she can’t join us). View Paula do Prado’s vibrant fabric collages, Vilma Bader’s responses to her northern artist residency, Sarah Eddowes’ experimentations in wax and Rebecca Shanahan’s feminist knitting project. Hear artists talk about everything from the doors of Tallinn, spruce and beech, linguistics and semiotics, waxy surfaces, the fusion of the geological and bodily, as well as gendered work under surveillance.  What else would you want to be doing on your Saturday afternoon? If stimulating artist talks are not enough then consider this: we are making cakes!

Four fabulous must-see exhibitions

10 Junction Street Marrickville

A 6-minute easy walk along Schwebel St from Marrickville Station

Bomba Dance and Collage Workshops

Bomba: Afro-Latin Dance Workshop

Saturday 8 April 4.30-6.30pm

or

Thursday 13th April 11am-1pm

$60 (adult) $20* (child 12 – 16yrs)

For bookings go to Afro-Latin Dance Workshop

Hurry! Only 6 places per workshop!

Afro-Uruguayan dancer and choreographer Mariu Meneses Betervide will give a dance workshop with a focus on the connections between movement, music and culture drawing on the richness of Afro-Latin dance traditions. Mariú has been performing and teaching for over 10 years both locally and overseas in various genres and styles. This fun and rhythmic workshop set to Afro-Latin music will introduce participants to her 4 elements technique, exploring Earth, Water, Fire and Air to explore creativity and open up body and sensory awareness. Includes short introductory artist talk by Paula do Prado.

* Children aged 12 and above can join if accompanied by a parent or guardian.
Light refreshments provided.

Bomba Offcuts

Fabric Collage Workshop

with

Paula do Prado

Thursday 20 April 2-4pm

$60.00

For Bookings go to Bomba: Offcuts

But hurry! Only 10 places*

Join Bomba exhibition artist Paula do Prado for a hands on workshop turning fabric scraps and remnants into a work of art through collage. Often referred to as appliqué or reverse appliqué, you will be shown how to fuse fabric together using fusible webbing to design and create your own fabric collage artwork to take home. Whilst making you’ll be listening to some of the music that inspired the work for Bomba. The workshop includes an artist’s talk with a focus on the connection between “making do”, craft and keeping culture alive.

No previous experience required as this workshop is suitable for beginners through to experienced crafters and makers. All materials and tools will be provided but if you have cotton or linen fabric you’d like to use or donate feel free to bring it in!

* Children aged 12 and above may also register to participate however they must work in pairs with an attending parent/guardian as we will be using hot irons to fuse fabric together.
Light refreshments provided.

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April Exhibitions

7 – 22 April 2017

Opening: Friday 7 April 6-8pm

Artist Talks: Saturday 22 April 3-5pm

All Welcome!

Gallery One
Paula do Prado
Bomba

The Bomba artworks are made from a mix of humble materials: fabric samples, cloth remnants, paint and paper. The use of collage on fabric and paper relates to the traditions of ‘making do’ and the bringing together of seemingly disparate, unrelated and disjointed elements assembled together to create something new and cohesive. In Afro-Uruguayan culture there are still strong links to superstition and the merging of Christian and West African religious beliefs. Lines become blurred and slippages occur between religion, magic, art, music, dance, ritual and ceremony. Bomba or blast becomes a visual metaphor for cultural collisions and explosions, resistance and survival.

Paula do Prado is running a Fabric Collage Workshop, Bomba: Offcuts, and has organised two Afro-Latin Dance Workshops run by Mariu Meneses Betervide. Go to Paula’s page on the AirSpace Projects blog for booking links here

Gallery Two
Vilma Bader
Northern Encounters

Northern Encounters consists of two bodies of work – Käsintehtyjä Suomessa (Handmade in Finland) conceived and made in situ during a residency in Finland and Geometry and Colour System in the Doors of Tallinn researched in Estonia and completed in Australia. The works explore the mnemonic function of linguistics, semiotics and space in the construction of identity.

Käsintehtyjä Suomessa (Handmade in Finland) 2016 is an installation-based work that functions as a collection of visual poems. Made entirely from Finnish birch and spruce, the integrity of the wood is preserved. Paint is used sparingly and expressive gesture and concern for surface textures are retained, juxtaposing the hand of the artist with that of nature.

In Geometry and Colour System in the Doors of Tallinn 2017 the flattening of perspective and focus on geometric shapes and colours collide with the many linguistic metaphors and aphorisms associated with the door.

The Cranny
Sarah Eddowes
Imprints

Sarah Eddowes’ work explores the object as a static imprint of a process of transformation. Coming from a background in animation, she is interested in showing direct movement in her animated work and the extension of this to the implication of change in the static object. Despite the abstract nature of the imagery, it alludes to certain universal processes of change, notably those of the geological and the bodily. The translucency of the wax recalls bodily textures, the organic shapes resemble cells, organs or bruises, and the pervading colours of pinks and cool turquoise are rooted in the tones of the body. Elements of geology such as structural shifts and faults, layering and compression of sediment are also recurring visual features.

The process of slicing is a prominent theme, both as a method of transformation and as a means of revealing a specific view of an object’s interior, much like a geological cross section or a magnetic resonance image (MRI). This process is similarly employed in animation and cinema where an illusion of motion is created by revealing one image at a time. In this way, her static work may be seen as cinematic objects.

Deep Space
Rebecca Shanahan
Home Security

Home Security uses performed actions and self-surveillance to synthesise ideas about temporality, gendered labour and contemporary conditions of existence. Filming herself with security cameras, the artist unravels adult jumpers and uses the yarn to knit children’s hats. Home Security models and reveals the invisible volunteer labour (usually women’s) that underpins capitalist economies yet is unaccounted for. The history of women knitting for others is often political, and this work operates in the current context of global family trauma and displacement. Unfolding in real time, the activities and video meditate on transience and the multiple networked presences of performed and documented everyday life.

2018 Callout

Images top to bottom:
Paula do Prado, Bewitched/Embrujada 2016, fabric collage, 71 x 67cm. Image: Alex Wisser.
Paula do Prado, Rebel/Rebelde 2016, fabric collage, 73 x73cm. Image: Alex Wisser.
Vilma Bader, Geometry and Colour System in the Doors of Tallinn, 2017, acrylic on plywood on 48 panels, each 19 x 11cm. Image courtesy of the artist.
Sarah Eddowes, Cells II, 2016, wax and wood, 25 x 33cm. Image courtesy of the artist.
Rebecca Shanahan, Home Security, 2017. Image: Rebecca Shanahan.
Callout, airspace Projects.

 

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Anthropocene

Special Screening and Talks

Saturday 18 March 2-5pm

Video Screening

Another Kind of Girl Collective

Followed by

Curator and Artist Talks

Grace Partridge and Nicole Monks

Join us on Saturday 18 March for an hour of short videos created by Another Kind of Girl Collective. The video project has been facilitated by US community artist Laura Doggett who has worked for a number of years with Syrian refugees to help document their stories and lives. Another Kind of Girl (the short film that became the face of the project) was aired at the Sydney Film Festival in 2016, winning numerous accolades, including previews at Cannes and One World Film festivals.

The screening will be followed by refreshments and talks by curator and founder of Antidote, Grace Partridge, and Western Australian artist Nicole Monks who has created the beautiful video and sand installation each and every morn at AirSpace Projects.

This is also your last chance to catch exhibitions by Kawita Vatanajyankar, Another Kind of Girl Collective, Andy Mullens and Nicole Monks before they close at 5pm Saturday 18 March.

ALL WELCOME!

V1_NAB Revised_Art Month

ANTHROPOCENE

3-18 March 2017

Opening: Friday 3 March 6-8pm

Curated by Grace Partridge

Another Kind of Girl

Nicole Monks

Andy Mullens

Kawita Vatanajyankur

kawitavatanajyankurscaleofjustice

The first iteration of Antidote is an exploration of the female body and the land on which it survives and thrives. Themed ‘Anthropocene’, the works manifest subversive views of this newly discovered and somewhat contentious geological epoch, in which the earth is defined by its negative interaction with human kind. The four artists chosen investigate unique stories of female bodies through a cross-cultural lens, while eliciting how they engage with their physical land – as well as the socio-political issues and cultural questions that may arise from such an interaction.

Another Kind of Girl

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The Another Kind of Girl’ Multimedia Project sees artist and educator, Laura Doggett, facilitate and present photography and film from Jordan, where she has worked for a number of years with Syrian refugees to help document their stories and lives. Another Kind of Girl, (the short film that became the face of the project) was aired at the Sydney Film Festival in 2016, winning numerous accolades, including previews at Cannes and One World Film festivals.

Nicole Monks

moving-moon_exhibition-still460

Nicole Monks’ second iteration of Owning the Moon is a manifestation of her body of work: trans-disciplinary and investigating the paradigms of time, place & space between her Indigenous background and her western one.

Andy Mullens

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Andy Mullens’ Bloodline is an intricate tapestry of history and diaspora. An assemblage of photos from Saigon, part strangers/part family – are re-contextualised through a connection of space, and a delicate red thread. Although all faces presented are affected by the war, the presentation of a chaotic family tree allows the viewer to commiserate the loss as well as revel in the connection to home and family.

Kawita Vatanajyankur

thescale_final1-copy

Kawita Vatanajyankur’s Machinized series is visually stunning – and in its simplicity, interrogates the concept of female labour, and the positioning more broadly of the female body in two worlds – her traditional Thai heritage, and the mechanically driven, consumption fuelled world of the West.

Kawita Vatanajyankur is represented by Stills Gallery.

For more information go to Antidote

Images top to bottom:
1. Kawita Vatanajyankur, The Scale of Justice, 2016, from Machinized, single channel HD video, 2:32 minutes. Courtesy of the artist and Stills Gallery.
2. Another Kind of Girl (film still), by Khaldiya, 9:31. Director & Cinematographer: Khaldiya Jibawi. Editors: Laura Doggett, Khaldiya Jibawi, Tasneem Toghoj. Courtesy of the artist.
3. Nicole Monks, Owning the Moon (still), 2016. Courtesy of the artist.
4. Andy Mullins, Bloodline, 2014, found photographs, cotton, tape, dimensions varied
5. Kawita Vatanajyankur, The Scale of Justice, 2016, from Machinized, single channel HD video, 2:32 minutes (courtesy of the artist and Stills Gallery).

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ARTIST TALKS

Saturday 25 February 3-5pm

I See Queer People

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Three fab exhibitions staged for the

Sydney Gay and Lesbian Mardi Gras Festival 2017

mardi-gras-festival-2017

Boys don’t cry

Kieran Butler

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Disco Infirmo

Curated by Jane Polkinghorne

Trevor Fry, Tina Havelock Stevens, Danica Knesevic, Renny Kodgers, Ladonnarama, Sean Lowry, Daniel Mudie Cunningham, Jane Polkinghorne, Ingrid Stiertzel

disco-infirmo-ball

Worse than Animals

Phil Soliman

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ALL WELCOME

10 Junction Street Marrickville

just 6 minutes walk from Marrickville Station

All images courtesy of the artists and AirSpace Projects ©2017

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I See Queer People

Three Exhibitions

10-25 February 2017

All Welcome

queerfeb2017

Images (clockwise from top left): Kieran Butler, A self-portrait for you, for me, for yoooo, for M and A and Gee too. 2016, Digital image file. Courtesy of the artist. Danica Knezevic, Constant Reflections, 2013, single channel, HD video. Courtesy of the artist. Tim Hilton/Ladonna Rama. Courtesy of the artist. Phil Soliman, The Vast Interior (View from the cave of St Anthony the Great), digital photograph. Courtesy of the artist.

mardi-gras-festival-2017

AirSpace Projects
10 Junction Street, Marrickville
Just 6 minutes easy walk from Marrickville Station

Opening Event

Friday 10 February 6-8pm

Artist Talks

As part of the

Sydney Gay and Lesbian Mardi Gras Festival 2017

Saturday 25 February 3-5pm

Gallery One

Boys don’t cry

Kieran Butler

170105_kb_a-self-portrait-for-you-for-me-for-yoooo-for-m-and-a-and-gee-too-copy-2

Boys don’t cry is a tragic love story, a casual hook-up and an awkward first time. It’s all the feelings you couldn’t say, the coming out you never always wanted and a person you thought you could fall in love with.

Boys don’t cry is about the materialities of love and relationships, the 21st century’s constant stream of information, and the way their associated power relations aid the breakdown and construction of one’s own identity. This exhibition is one instance of how we might work through the endless experiences of being under construction, the questions we ask, the self-doubt we face, the love we feel and the places, real, imagined, semi-fictional or fluid it may take us to; online or offline.

For myself, as a gay man, this has been a long, enduring and seemingly lonely experience, a slow construction of my own identity full of self-doubt. I ask myself questions about masculinity, femininity, LGBTQI colloquial language and popular culture; things I don’t understand, things I want to reject/accept, things I’ve felt removed from yet so close to at the same time. In the digital age materiality points to a mess of diverse factors where materiality itself can be an effect of “an ongoing performance”.[1] In this work I am referring to my own ongoing unsuccessful and semi-fictional performances of love as a homosexual, the identity politics of my own socio-political context and how I navigate them.

I am not the first to say boys don’t cry and this exhibition is by no means definitive of LGBTQI experiences. It is merely one of the many stories that exist in spaces that are real and tangible, sometimes imagined, semi-fictional and fluid.

[1] Lange Berndt, P. Documents of Contemporary Art: Materiality, MIT Press, London, 2015, pg.12

Gallery Two and The Cranny

Disco Infirmo

Trevor Fry
Tina Havelock Stevens
Danica Knesevic
Renny Kodgers
Ladonnarama
Sean Lowry
Daniel Mudie Cunningham
Jane Polkinghorne
Ingrid Stiertzel

Curated by Jane Polkinghorne

4-dknezevic-constantr

Disco conjures a nostalgically, shiny, glamorous past while simultaneously suggesting disco’s collapse into a sparkling hole of excess and ridicule.

Disco Infirmo uses disco in the Australian context as its starting point, remote from the high glamour of the disco era at its peak at Studio 54, New York Operating from Australian vernaculars of ‘secondhandism’, the artists incorporate and infect this imported form, corrupting, mutilating and lionising via Australian cultural anti-glamour.

The artists respond to the sensations that Disco Infirmo evokes – nostalgia, sparkles, nausea, dance fails, Blue Light Discos, ridiculous fashion, rhythmic music, those too old for the dance floor, the bad and almost good dancers, Aussie pub rock discos, and mum and dad dancing inappropriately. Out of time and out of place, and yet the disco continues to be a democratic field for creative expression.

Deep Space

Worse than Animals

Phil Soliman

still-from-worse-than-animals-hd-video-loop-with-sound-2016

In Worse than animals, Melbourne-based multidisciplinary artist Phil Soliman takes the worst insult he has ever endured and shapes it into a powerful symbol of identity. A gloriously psychedelic mashup of pop culture, internet ephemera, ancient Egyptian mythology and house music, this video installation challenges toxic homophobia and other types of othering with humour and insight.

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Thank You Artists,

Supporters and Friends!

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We’re disappearing for a bit but look forward to seeing you again at the first opening of 2017

I See Queer People

Something for everyone from

the young, the infirm to the spiritual

Friday 10 February 6-8pm

mardi-gras-festival-2017

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Contemporary Art and Feminism

Art, Feminism, Australia, Now

Ray Filar

Journalist, writer, editor

Art Sleuth

Delving into the murky depths of the contemporary London art scene

Broad Strokes: The National Museum of Women in the Arts' Blog

The National Museum of Women in the Arts is the only museum in the world dedicated exclusively to recognizing the contributions of women artists.

Art F City

New York art news and reviews.

www.unmagazine.org/

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Marrickville Garage

An artist space in Marrickville in our garage