Join Us For Our

Special Summer Exhibitions

18-27 January 2018

Thursday, Friday, Saturday 11am – 5pm


Wednesday 17 January 6-8pm


Nostradamus: a January offering

curated by

Sebastian Henry-Jones and Nanette Orly

Suu-Mei Chew
Kalanjay Dhir
Szymon Dorabialski
Mimi Kind
Mashara Wachjudy
Justine Youssef

Opening Wednesday 17 January 6-8pm

The past year has delivered a tumultuous series of events that has affected people on a global scale. In uncertain times, there is a tendency to interpret and respond to change, to feel connected and in control once more. Nostradamus: a January offering will explore notions and practices of ritual as a way of connecting with a new understanding of ‘the future’. How do rituals, objects of power and faith allow us to gain new perspectives of a fragmented present?

Opening at the start of a new year, the exhibition then, is itself a ritual, an attempt at forecasting and influencing the course of 2018. The show wishes to consider the exhibition format itself as ritual, and would like to exaggerate these aspects of exhibition-making and artistic practice. Nostradamus: a January offering brings together the work of six emerging artists that offer a range of alternative futures, different attitudes towards the future and ways ahead, or simply offer instruction as to how to make do in our current time.

Image above: Justine Youssef, Ashes to ashes or palm ash to your wrist (film still), 2017, single channel video (1:02min on loop), text on a4 paper, dimensions variable.


Emerging artists Belle Blau, Paula McCambridge and Cameron Stead present new works with curatorial assistance provided by Upasana Papadopoulos. FLEX  explores, challenges and disrupts the power structures that frame their personal, professional and political lives through use of various mediums including painting, installation and digital media.


Pamela Leung

Pamela Leung’s works often draw on the migratory experience with relationships, connections, displacement and diaspora being the dominant themes. She uses red or white in her works to refer to cultural, spiritual and traditional memories as well as meditation, Zen, emotion and the ordinariness of everyday life. She frequently brings together found materials or everyday objects to create symbolic sculptures or installations. Through the process of mark making, her drawings are careful compositions of lines that strongly suggest meditations on the everyday.


Marlene Sarroff

Indeterminate Structures

“What is unknown can only be imagined”

The intervention into the Deep Space consists of a complex system. Created out of many small parts, the building of the whole is considered from the point of view of the whole rather than the single parts. Arising from the unplanned assembling, transitory structures of an indeterminate nature, are created with an emphasis on modes of organisation and interrelated arrangements. Throughout the duration of the exhibition, further possibilities will be explored in reorganising the structures, shifting, disseminating and altering the shapes and re-arranging them into new formations with ongoing consideration of the space they are situated in.