GALLERY ONE

Special Summer Exhibition

18-27 January 2018

Thursday, Friday, Saturday 11am-5pm

Nostradamus: a January offering

curated by

Sebastian Henry-Jones and Nanette Orly

Suu-Mei Chew
Kalanjay Dhir
Szymon Dorabialski
Mimi Kind
Mashara Wachjudy
Justine Youssef

Opening Wednesday 17 January 6-8pm

The past year has delivered a tumultuous series of events that has affected people on a global scale. In uncertain times, there is a tendency to interpret and respond to change, to feel connected and in control once more. Nostradamus: a January offering will explore notions and practices of ritual as a way of connecting with a new understanding of ‘the future’. How do rituals, objects of power and faith allow us to gain new perspectives of a fragmented present?

Opening at the start of a new year, the exhibition then, is itself a ritual, an attempt at forecasting and influencing the course of 2018. The show wishes to consider the exhibition format itself as ritual, and would like to exaggerate these aspects of exhibition-making and artistic practice. Nostradamus: a January offering brings together the work of six emerging artists that offer a range of alternative futures, different attitudes towards the future and ways ahead, or simply offer instruction as to how to make do in our current time.

Image above: Justine Youssef, Ashes to ashes or palm ash to your wrist (film still), 2017, single channel video (1:02min on loop), text on a4 paper, dimensions variable.

Artist Profiles


Suu-Mei Chew

when i say my body is a tropical malady i mean i carry the malaise of humidity in my marrow connecting fevers (flights of body heat) which is to say attached but in tension and inside u and myself as you to me- purity is the lotus root fed from muddy waters. to be a pontianak killjoy: to be sick and the sickness itself: subject to possession to disavow dispossession as i am haunted i haunt: a problematised intrusion into the cartesian foundation of capitalist realism – my body is not a machine because it is faulty and cannot be programmed my spirit cannot transcend for it is bonded in devotion a loving attachment to and of this world so let me be stuck and rooted and routing, turned/turning.

Draft1, 2017, screenshot.


Kalanjay Dhir

Kalanjay Dhir is an artist and failed-viral content creator. Born and based in Parramatta to an interracial migrant couple (non-white), he has only known an accelerated environment. Kal is very worried about our future and his work attempts deal with this nausea through humour and false relief.

Automated Mala WIP-PoC ((Proof of Concept) after Paik’s TV Buddha), 2017, electronics,
sandalwood prayer beads, recycled materials.


Szymon Dorabialski

Szymon’s practice exists as a personal enquiry into transcendental states of consciousness and as an observation of how the ‘divine’ experience comes to manifest within the restricted scopes of human epistemologies. Stemming from an interest in the aesthetic qualities of religion, pseudo science, metaphysics and psychedelics, Szymon’s light and sculpture installations seek to take everyday objects, tools and refuse and ostensibly reconfigure them into symbols of worship. These forms are employed as investigatory tools that play with the liberties and/or restrictions of creating a pliable personal understanding of the divine. As opposed to exclusively adhering to inherited cultural structures for the depiction of the transcendental realm. Szymon has recently completed a MFA at Sydney College of the Arts, writing a research paper entitled Peering into the Crack of the Divine.

Network, Tenderiser, urn (installation detail), 2016, rubber kick ball core, enamel, wooden tenderiser, gloss enamel, imitation gold leaf, rose wood, steel, chrysanthemum, from ‘Divine Debris: Worshipping the Invisible, Demanding an explanation’ an exhibition at Firstdraft.


Mimi Kind

Mimi Kind is a Sydney-based maker of kinetic sound sculptures, installations and music. In her practice she draws upon her fascination with movement and her background in music (as a flautist and from her university studies in composition) as she strives to release and organise unique sounds and movements from objects.

Timbals, 2017, coin tins DC motors, metal wire, pipe cleaners, electrical tape, electrical cable.


Mashara Wachjudy

Wachjudy is currently studying a Bachelor of Fine Arts and Bachelor of Arts. Her solo exhibition ‘I walked forward to the west’ was presented at Bus Projects in August, 2017. Other recent exhibitions include group shows ‘Woven’ at Verge Gallery and ‘hell broth’ curated by Astrid Lorange and Vaughan O’Connor at Firsdraft. Wachjudy has exhibited in Sydney and Melbourne in both gallery and alternative spaces including Firstdraft, Verge Gallery and The Honeymoon Suite as well as performing at Carriageworks with Bus Projects for Sydney Contemporary 2015. Mashara Wachjudy’s practice is predominantly a consideration of the architecture memory and cross-cultural experience. Grounded in
photography, her work extends to sculptural and spatial realms where material, texture, object and matter become a way of negotiating between the physical and emotional.

Two Gates, 2017, digital photograph.


Justine Youssef

Justine Youssef’s practice is a response to site specific research into the social, cultural and political structures that shape moments and places. She uses private and public narratives to reveal the structures that condition our experiences, and understand the identity politics of communities in the diaspora. This lends the work to a range of disciplines including installation, scent, video, drawing and text. She has participated in group exhibitions in Sydney at spaces such as Bankstown Art Centre, Bankstown; 475 King Street, Newtown; and Lilac City Studios, Surry Hills. Her work has also been featured in Antidote’s Moving Nations 2017, Collab Gallery, Chippendale. Her work can be found in the collections of the National Association for the Visual Arts; the National Art School Drawing Archive; and the Sydney Gallery School. Since 2015, Youssef has maintained a collaboration with artist Duha Ali through a series of videos and installations which draw on cartographic practices and transnational narratives.

An other’s wurud (detail), 2017, David Austin rose, water, hot plate, glass jar, aluminium pot, sieve
and bowl, dimensions variable.