February Exhibitions

2-17 February

Preview: from 11am Friday 2 February

Opening: Friday 2 February 6-8pm

Artist Talks: Saturday 17 February, 3-5pm

GALLERY ONE

Introducing the new committee members

Uri Auerbach, Janine Bailey, Matina Bourmas,
Stella Chen, Sally Clarke, Marty Cordoba,
Paula do Prado, Brenda Factor, Vedna Jivan,
Bailee Lobb, Sarah Newall, Anie Nheu,
Rafaela Pandolfini, Upasana Papadopoulos,
Grace Partridge, Catherine Polcz, Helen Wyatt

exhibiting committee members 

After running for four years as an independent art space directed by Sally Clarke and Brenda Factor, AIRspace Projects has entered a new exciting phase by incorporating into a not-for-profit association. While Sally and Brenda will still be involved, the refresh button has been pressed and we look forward to new ideas, new structures, new looks and new energy. This is a chance to meet and chat with the new committee members and become acquainted with their work. Find out what we have in store for 2018 and beyond.

GALLERY TWO

Portals + Parables

Catherine Parker + David Usher

Queensland-based artists Catherine Parker + David Usher both have an inherent and inescapable attachment to nature and the vastness of the internal and external landscape.

Parker continues her exploration of time and place and human relationships within nature. She believes that all these elements can co-exist freely and fluidly at once.

Through the depiction of ancient landforms the works meld the familiar with the ethereal, while vibrant colour schemes from neon pinks to deep indigos rein us into the present.

Parker invites us to traverse the landscapes within the canvas, navigating the different territories whether they are physical, spiritual, psychological, metaphorical, historical or mythological.

The viewer is invited into a nuanced space that has multiple entry points. Using landscapes as diverse as Magnetic Island, her home in Toowoomba, Queensland and the Himalayas as a starting point, Parker’s paintings present us with portals to multidimensional spaces and times, should we choose to enter.

Usher’s current series of landscape paintings and ceramic vessels further explore memories of travelling through the Australian landscape as a child and viewing this landscape from the backseat of a moving car.

These road trips form a parable in which the blurring endless panorama can be reinterpreted through mark making, evoking a sense of the sublime.

The car window becomes a portal to mythological spaces and serves to frame the trance-like state the viewer/passenger enters as they gaze out at the seemingly limitless plains, valleys and hills.

This rushing view is broken only by the skipping dance of fences, gates, crossroads and occasional signs of life. The images that are remembered haze together into an endless landscape. Back in his studio, he recalls moments, places and encounters that can be reconstructed as art works invested with personal significance and coding.

THE CRANNY

Ambiguous Materiality

Emma Gardner

Photograph © Thomas Oliver

Using the self as a site for exploration, Material Ambiguity explores the subtleties of contemporary femininity: where vulnerability and strength are synonymous with each other.

DEEP SPACE

A little better

Rodrigo Azaola

‘A little better’ is the result of six month’s research of cryptocurrency trading in instant messaging platforms. For millennia, currencies were backed by physical assets until 1971, when Richard Nixon announced the end of the U.S. dollar backed by gold reserves. Since then, the value of all world currencies is entrusted to promises made by state authorities and central banks.

For first time in history, cryptocurrency allows the creation and transfer of wealth within decentralized trustless systems. Nevertheless, the value of cryptocurrencies is still arbitrary, ephemeral, irrational, and yet, it establishes a common belief in which trust and value is now legitimized by cryptographical algorithms and global microcommunities instead of governments or banks.

Weeks before Nixon terminated the gold standard, he was secretly recorded talking about the economy. In a moment of brutal honesty or perhaps self-delusion he admitted: “We are just running the chaos a little better”. Almost half a century later, the rise of cryptocurrencies may be fueled by delusional thinking and hope. It makes sense to ask if it’s sustainable, even rational. Perhaps not. But, still today, neither is world economy.

Come and talk with Rodrigo before he takes his work to the Manila Biennale 2018: Open Cities

 

We are  open for the first three weeks of each month and the fourth weekend excluding January. Keep an eye out for extra events.